Artworks by Wu Liangyan

National Treasure – realm no.4 by Wu Liangyan

63 x 60 x 42cm
Bronze
Year: 2012

National Treasure – Realm no.9 by Wu Liangyan

80 x 39 x 80cm
Bronze
Year: 2015

Book Burden by Wu Liangyan

140 x 115 x 63cm
Bronze
Year: 2011

Day Day Up – Hero by Wu Liangyan

60 x 28 x 22cm
Bronze
Year: 2011

Day Day Up – Astro Boy by Wu Liangyan

63 x 24 x 29cm
Bronze
Year: 2011

Kung Fu no.2 by Wu Liangyan

90 x 39 x 35cm
Bronze
Year: 2011

Ode to Motherland no.1 by Wu Liangyan

56 x 30x 20cm
Bronze
Year: 2008

Flowers of the Motherland NO.5 by Wu Liangyan

80 x 78 x 35cm
Bronze
Year: 2011

Wu Liangyan

吴梁焰

Wu Liangyan has sculpted many images of children wearing red scarves . These children with plump cheeks and heads held-up high, full of mirth and bursting with happiness, could easily ignite the memory of several generations of Chinese and draw us back to the childhood days when we were playing around and making troubles while facing heavy academic burdens. In Wu’s works we could nd different forms of children that are rich with symbolic signi cance and embody the sculptor’s mature examinations and insights regarding the historic development and societal phenomena of China as well as values and orientations in life.

Wu Liangyan’s works have been shown in Beijing, Singapore, US, Canada and France, as well as widely collected by institutions and collectors from China, US, France, Singapore, Malaysia, Taiwan and Hong Kong, including Bengbu University and VPark.

As natural and social beings, none of us could escape the modern dilemma of being a self- contradicting paradox. Sharp-eyed as they are, artists should be able to capture this phenomenon and present it in front of the public with ingenuity. Wu Liangyan is de nitely one of these artists. Featuring penetrating social criticism and a relaxed and lively style, Wu’s works both neutralize and amplify the collision between the con icting powers.

With bulging cheeks and closed eyes, the characters stand on one leg and hold each other’s hands to face the outside world. In addition to their rather mature style of clothing, they always wear a bright-colored red scarf. All of us are familiar with the symbolic meaning of red scarves, an integral part of the school uniform for primary school students around China—another example of the con ict between the adult world and innocent childhood.

For the younger generation of artists that were born under the red ag and grew up during the 1980s, red scarf embodies the eagerness to attain con rmation of one’s values and orientations. And Wu Liangyan with his sculpted characters that hold their heads high and smile sweetly is exactly expressing this desire and impulse to win approval.