Artworks by Salvador Dali

Horse Saddled with Time by Salvador Dali

44.4 cm height
Bronze
Edition of 350

Man with Butterfly by Salvador Dali

55.5 cm height
Bronze
Edition 350
Conceived in 1968, first cast in 1984

Mae West Lips Sofa by Salvador Dali

84 cm height
Textile & wood
Edition 8 plus 4 EA
Conceived in 1936, created in textiles and wood in 1974

Persistence of Memory by Salvador Dali

37 cm height
Bronze
Edition of 350
Conceived and first cast in 1980

Hommage to Newton by Salvador Dali

39.3 x 15 x 9 cm
Bronze
Year 1980 – 1984

Bracelli Lamp by Salvador Dali

180 cm height
Various materials
Conceived in the 1930’s, first production in the 1990’s

Unicorn by Salvador Dali

183 cm height
Bronze
7 plus 3 EA
Conceived in 1977, first cast in 1984

Profile of Time by Salvador Dali

20 cm height
Bronze
Edition 350

Muletas Lamp by Salvador Dali

185 cm height
Various Materials
Conceived in the 1930’s, first production in the 1990’s

Surrealist Newton by Salvador Dali

179 cm height
Bronze
25 plus 2 EA
Conceived in 1977, first cast in 1984

Persistence of Memory by Salvador Dali

191 cm Height
Bronze
6 plus 3 EA
Conceived and first cast in 1980

Cajones Lamp by Salvador Dali

87 cm height
Various Materials
Conceived in the 1930’s, first production in the 1990’s

Woman Aflame by Salvador Dali

84 cm height
Bronze
Edition 350
Conceived and first cast in 1980

Man with Butterfly by Salvador Dali

179 cm height
Bronze
8 plus 4 EA
Conceived in 1968, first cast in 1984

Hommage to Fashion by Salvador Dali

179 cm height
Bronze
8 plus 4 EA

Dance of Time III by Salvador Dali

124 cm (height)
Bronze
Edition of 8 plus 4 EA

Vis-a-vis Sofa by Salvador Dali

80 x 170 x 82 cm
Wooden Socket Lined with Polished Lacquered Brass Plate
100% Natural Silk Cover
Year: 1935 – 1937

Leda Low Table by Salvador Dali

51 x 190 x 61 cm
Cast Varnished Brass & Marble
Year: 1935

Leda Armchair by Salvador Dali

47 x 60 x 92 cm
Cast Polished & Varnished Brass
Year: 1935

Triumphant Elephant by Salvador Dali

52 cm (height)
Edition of 350

Homage to Fashion by Salvador Dali

1999
100 x 70 cm
Lithograph, Serigraph, L’eau Forte
Edition of 500 + 50 AP

Elephant De Triomphe by Salvador Dali

1999
100 x 70 cm
Lithograph, Serigraph, L’eau Forte
Edition of 500 + 50 AP

Lady Godiva with Butterflies by Salvador Dali

1999
100 x 70 cm
Lithograph, Serigraph, L’eau Forte
Edition of 500 + 50 AP

Dance of Time II by Salvador Dali

30 cm (height)
Edition of 350

Space Elephant by Salvador Dali

277 cm (height)
Bronze
6 plus 3 EA
Conceived and first cast in 1980

Alice in Wonderland by Salvador Dali

1999
100 x 70 cm
Lithograph, Serigraph, L’eau Forte
Edition of 500 + 50 AP

 

Dance of Time I by Salvador Dali

30 cm (height)
Bronze
Edition of 350

Dance of Time by Salvador Dali

1999
100 x 70 cm
Lithograph, Serigraphy, L’eau Forte
Edition of 500 + 50 AP

Surrealist Piano by Salvador Dali

1999
100 x 70 cm
Lithograph, Serigraph, L’eau Forte
Edition of 500 + 50 AP

Salvador Dali

Salvador Dali is one of the most celebrated artists of all time. His fiercely technical yet highly unusual paintings, sculptures and visionary explorations in film and life-size interactive art ushered in a new generation of imaginative expression. From his personal life to his professional endeavors, he always took great risks and proved how rich the world can be when you dare to embrace pure, boundless creativity.

Salvador Dali was born on May 11, 1904 to parents Salvador Dali Cusi, a prominent notary, and Felipa Domenech Ferres, a gentle mother who often indulged young Salvador’s eccentric behavior. Felipa was a devout Catholic and the elder Salvador an Atheist, which was a combination that heavily influenced their son’s worldview. Dali’s artistic talent was obvious from a young age, and both of his parents supported it—though it is known that the relationship with his disciplinarian father was strained. Ultimately, Dali’s raw creativity and defiant attitude would distance him from his father, but it would also become the cornerstone of his wildly imaginative artistic feats. .

After passing through phases of Cubism, Futurism and Metaphysical painting, he joined the Surrealists in 1929 and his talent for self-publicity rapidly made him the most famous representative of the movement. Throughout his life he cultivated eccentricity and exhibitionism (one of his most famous acts was appearing in a diving suit at the opening of the London Surrealist exhibition in 1936), claiming that this was the source of his creative energy. He took over the Surrealist theory of automatism but transformed it into a more positive method which he named `critical paranoia’.

His paintings employed a meticulous academic technique that was contradicted by the unreal `dream’ space he depicted and by the strangely hallucinatory characters of his imagery. He described his pictures as `hand-painted dream photographs’ and had certain favorite and recurring images, such as the human figure with half- open drawers protruding from it, burning giraffes, and watches bent and flowing as if made from melting wax.